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Press

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia, Valencia, 2016
"Perfect the Mozartean quartet of young lovers: Mark Milhofer, Dan Kempson, Nozomi Kato, and Leah Partridge, great and beautiful, daring to sing almost stripped."
"Perfetto il quartetto mozartiano dei giovani innamorati, Mark Milhofer, Dan Kempson, Nozomi Kato e Leah Partridge, bravi e belli, fino a osare il canto quasi spogliati."
- Carla Moreni, Il sole 24 Ore

"Helena ( Leah Partridge ) and Demetrius (Dan Kempson ) had considerable projection ... They were also the most committed actors."
"Mejoró asimismo después. Helena (Leah Partridge) y Demetrius (Dan Kempson) lucieron una proyección considerable ... Todos ellos fueron, además, entregadísimos actores."
- Rosa Sola, Valencia CulturPlaza

 Lucia di Lammermoor at Eugene Opera

"She sings the role of Lucia, and she does it with such natural power and clarity and verve and just about every other positive singing attribute that you can imagine that it would hardly matter if the rest of the performance of Lucia di Lammermoor was done by third graders. But Patridge’s performance, starting with her duet with tenor David Gustafson, as Edgardo, brought the audience first to its knees, and finally to its feet, cheering. The guy next to me started babbling happily about being put in touch with the cosmos as her final mad scene ended. I felt myself, inexplicably, near tears. She was that good."  EUGENE ART TALK   CLICK HERE FOR ARTICLE

"Lucia, realized by Leah Partridge, brought her consummate acting in addition to her brilliant prowess as a coloratura soprano. Partridge foreshadowed Lucia’s madness with such grace and inevitability, radiating love, hatred, stubbornness and grief with such rapidity that my own emotions remained tangled long after the night was over. Her voice was in perfect form, top notes bright and piercing, and although she occasionally sacrificed some vocal richness, she found warmth and power in the maddest mad scene in all of opera repertoire. The production raised the stakes with the use of modern guns, and the suddenness with which her final scene concluded was stunning in every sense of the word."     THE REGISTER-GUARD   CLICK HERE FOR ARTICLE

 Marie in La Fille du Regiment at Mill City Summer Opera

"But this opera is all about Marie, and Mill City smartly cast the young and attractive Leah Partridge, whose silvery, elegantly supple voice — a lyric coloratura with an especially agile top register — is perfect for the role. Beverly Sills described Marie as "Lucille Ball with high notes," and Partridge's Marie caught that zany spirit."      

Minneapolis Star-Tribune

Musetta at Atlanta Opera 

"Zvulun reimagined The Café Momus scene as a highly choreographed series of events leading up to Musetta’s waltz. Musetta, played by soprano Leah Partridge, is a grisette or working girl who craves the limelight; Partridge’s great showmanship made her Musetta frenetic and exciting."      OPERA NEWS   

"Atlanta resident and Lincolnton native Leah Partridge gives us a Musetta that’s proud and brazen, but also intuitive and sympathetic, a blend of trash and class, a flash of color and self-determination in an otherwise dingy city. She avoids making the famous “Quando m’en vo” aria a simple, lovely ditty, but brings out the character’s use of it as taunt and manipulation."

                   ATLANTA  JOURNAL CONSTITUTION  CLICK HERE FOR ARTICLE

 

Interview with the Atlanta Journal Constitution  CLICK HERE FOR ARTICLE

 

Michaela at Opera Omaha

 

"For her part, Partridge brought a nuanced layer of versatile dimensionality to a character that often comes off as overly naive. She portrayed Micaela as spirited and strong-willed, and her voice had a spectacularly clear quality to it, utterly gorgeous with its expressiveness and sheer power. "  Omaha World-Herald  

 

 

The Pearl Fishers at Michigan Opera Theater

"Leah Partridge’s beautiful soprano bounces from pillar to pillar of the Detroit Opera House, making Leila’s voice as beautiful as the actress. It is no wonder that Zurga and Nadir would fight for her love." www.dailytribune.com

 

"So too with Leah Partridge, who was first cast in 2007s world premiere of DiChiera’s “Cyrano.” Here she gives a wonderful vocal performance with beautiful runs and fine trills and modulating her voice to great effect." www.encoremichigan.com

 

Concert with Elina Garanca at the Schloss Esterhazy, Eisenstadt, Austria

"Doch im Zentrum standen natürlich die großen Stimmen. Denn als zweite Sängerin bewies die Sopranistin Leah Partridge, warum sie den Status „Talent“ schon lange hinter sich hat und am Beginn einer wahrhaft großen Karriere steht. Ob Donizettis „Regnava nel silenzio (aus Lucia di Lammermoor) oder Bernsteins „Glitter and Be Gay (aus Candide)“ – die junge US-Amerikanerin begeisterte mit virtuoser Technik und sichtlicher Freude an der Musik.

Besondere Highlights waren die wundervollen Duette von El?na Garan?a und Leah Partridge: Bellinis „Ah! crudel…Vieni, ah! in me riposa (aus I Capuleti e i Montecchi)“ vor der Pause und „Mira, o Norma (aus Norma)“ zum Abschluss des offiziellen Programms." diepresse.com

 

Roxane, Florida Grand Opera

"Partridge, for whom DiChiera actually wrote the role of Roxane, has a full-bodied, far-reaching soprano voice that is truly un-be-lievable. She also managed to pull off her coquettish, firtatious role so seamlessly that it had me saying, "God, what a bitch! Is she the last woman on earth? Why do all these men like her?" even while my jaw dropped in awe of her arias."

Miami New Times

"Partridge possesses a full, rich voice, captivating in its beauty and grace."

Opera Now

Violetta, Opera Company of Philadelphia

"What was particularly wonderful about Partridge was her ability to maintain a vocal glow of great presence even in spots where Violetta was defeated ("Addio, del passato"). No spoiler here, but the way she handles the end was smart and utterly effecting."

The Philadelphia Inquirer

 

Lakmé, Florida Grand Opera

“An FGO perennial just beginning to make her mark in larger theaters — she made her Met debut in Peter Grimes in 2008 — lovely Leah Partridge returned to the company as Lakmé, giving the performance of a seasoned, mature artist. The soprano's singing and acting set the attention squarely on her. Partridge's bell song was a little bit of magic: patient and confident, the whole of it was imbued with an air of mystery, intriguing nuance and rubato.”

Opera News

 

“The Georgia-born soprano’s radiant stage presence and vocal artistry again won the day. She rose to the supreme challenge of the Act 2 Bell Song in spectacular style, evocative in the Eastern vocalise of the introduction, and sailing through the aria’s stratospheric pyrotechnics while making the scene’s dire dramatic situation evident. The soprano went from strength to strength in Act 3, delivering affecting vocalism in Lakme’s death scene.”

South Florida Classical Review

 

“Partridge showed a phenomenal coloratura technique and superb vocal control, including the seamless legato singing that is required throughout most of the opera. This was more than the fine performance by a local favorite, this was a masterful performance by an artist who deserves the attention of major companies worldwide.”

www.operawarhorses.com

 

La Charmeuse, The Metropolitan Opera

“Leah Partridge sang a beautifully sinuous vocalise to accompany the exotic dancing.”

The Wall Street Journal

 

 

Maria Padilla, Washington Concert Opera

" Promising young coloratura Leah Partridge tackled the role of Maria with skill and gusto. In a recent Opera News interview described the role as being "Lucia on steroids". She was at her full powers, with a gleaming, bright tone, a stellar trill, well-articulated coloratura runs and roulades, and convincingly conveyed the emotional import of the words and notes. In the great central confrontations between Maria and Don Ruiz, she was heartbreaking in her intensity. The second verse of the final cabaletta was bejeweled with new, high-flying ornamentation that almost, but not quite, got away from this ambitious young soprano. The standing ovation that washed over her at the end of the performance was well-merited." Dan Foley, Donizetti Society Newsletter, 2009

 

Cleopatra, Florida Grand Opera

“Local favorite Leah Partridge has shown her versatility in roles from Violetta to Amina last season in La Sonnambula, but one was unprepared for her extraordinary charismatic turn as Cleopatra. In her slit-to-there evening gowns Partridge's sexy, flapper-style Cleo commanded the stage whether enticing her brother Tolomeo or in disguise to entrap Caesar. As the self-aware, leggy mankiller, Partridge showed great comic flair and striking physical agility, keeping perfectly in tune and tossing off Non disperar, chi sa? as Asawa dragged her by the legs across the stage.”

“Vocally, Partridge was at her finest, agile and assured in the coloratura challenges. Cautious in decoration early on, by Act 3 she was throwing off stratospheric grace notes with ease. The singer was most effective in Cleopatra's big set pieces, bringing great expressive depth and shading to Piangero la sorte mia, and, especially, a spacious, heart-breaking Se pieta, di me non senti that reduced the vast Ziff audience to silence.”

Lawrence A. Johnson, The Miami Herald

 

Konstanze, Chicago Opera Theater

“Leah Partridge brought a clear, agile soprano to Konstanze and was a self-possessed, willowy Edwardian beauty in her slim lace gown and brimmed hat. Facing down the pasha's threats, she sailed through Mozart's treacherous coloratura flights with red-hot anger and tonal purity as white as fresh snow.”

The Chicago Sun Times

 

“Her slender figure elegantly costumed, the shining soprano Leah Partridge made it through the killer role of Constanze with clarity, accuracy and poise.”

Opera Magazine

 

Amina, Florida Grand Opera

“The whole affair — starring Leah Partridge, directed by Renata Scotto and conducted by Richard Bonynge — is drenched in gentle languor, and it takes patience as well as virtuosity to bring it to life.

The beautiful Partridge sang like an angel and looked like a sigh. On stage she cut the figure of a romantic ballerina, given gestures by Scotto that hovered sweetly between real life and dance. Her singing was, well, spectacular. It had effortless coloratura, light and airy phrasing, full command of dynamics if not always of nuance, with a welcome smoky color to the middle and chest tones that I did not remember from her previous appearances. Her secure, easy top soared up to a radiant E-flat. Sleepwalking in the footsteps of Maria Callas, of the great Joan Sutherland, of Scotto herself, Partridge sounded like none of them and made the music her own — florid cadenzas and all.”

Octavio Roca, Miami New Times

 

“Soprano Leah Partridge once again repays the Florida Grand Opera's faith in her ascending career with a splendid, multihued performance that carries a new production of Bellini's La Sonnambula.

 

The leading lady's coloratura ranges from silvery to ebony as Amina, the maiden who unknowingly sleepwalks her way into a village scandal. Partridge finds and explores the role's emotional hooks under director Renata Scotto (whose Amina in Edinburgh in 1958 established her own diva-ship). Finding them is one thing; Partridge sustains a credible balance of the occasionally too-close-for-comfort mishmash of joy and sorrow. It's her fourth leading role for Florida Grand since Scotto directed her in La Traviata in 2003.”

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

 

“Starring Miami's favorite young diva, Leah Partridge, in a role she seemed born to sing, La Sonnambula was opera heaven, a thrilling and impossibly beautiful show.”

Miami New Times

 

Roxane, Michigan Opera Theater

“The object of Cyrano's affection, the beautiful Roxane, finds lovely presence and shining voice in soprano Leah Partridge.”

The Detroit News

 

Leila, Madison Opera

“Vocally, however, the show was stolen by Leah Partridge as Leila, the lovely priestess beloved by both friends. Her strong and beautiful voice, together with confident theatrical and stylistic gifts, gave real credibility to her somewhat improbable character.”

Isthmus The Daily Page